Professor Nagasaki will give a presentation at TECHNOLOGY LECTURES AND SYMPOSIUM on October 31, 2019

Professor Nagasaki will give a presentation at TECHNOLOGY LECTURES AND SYMPOSIUM on October 31, 2019

・ Dates : October 31(Thu),2019
・ Venue :The Omni Hotel, 1050 Sherbrooke St. W, Montreal, QC H3A 2R6, adjacent to the Mcgill Main Campus
・ Session &Theme : Health Innovation through genomics
・ Title: Genome cohort projects in Japan and biomedical analyses towards  discoveries of diseases causing variants
・ Language : English

Kyoto-Mcgill International Collaborative Program in Genomic Medicine

Professor Nagasaki was invited symposium at the 3rd JCS Council Forum on Basic CardioVascular Research on September 8, 2019

Professor Nagasaki was invited symposium at the 3rd JCS Council Forum on Basic CardioVascular Research(BCVR 2019) on September 8, 2019

http://www.congre.co.jp/bcvr2019/eng/

・ Dates : September 8(Sun),2019

・ Venue : Room : Tokyo Convention Hall, Tokyo, Japan

・ Session &Theme : Genomics in Cardiology

・ Title:  Development and application of biomedical methods to facilitate the detection of disease-causing variants based on whole genome data from Japanese

・ Language : English

Professor Nagasaki was invited lecture at the Genome Expo 2019 on August 28, 2019

Professor Nagasaki was invited lecture at the Genome Expo 2019 on August 28, 2019

http://genomeexpo.com/english/

・ Dates : August 28(Wed),2019

・ Venue : Room : U110, Engineering Bldg. 4, UNIST, Ulsan, Korea

・ Session & Theme : International Symposium on Human Genomics

・ Title: Genome cohort projects in Japan and biomedical analyses toward the discoveries of disease-causing variants

・ Language : English

The 84th In Silico Megabank Research Seminar, Seminar of Toshiba-Tohoku University Joint Research on Quantum Cryptography Communication, and Security Seminar (December 14, 2017)

The 84th In Silico Megabank Research Seminar , Seminar of Toshiba-Tohoku University Joint Research on Quantum Cryptography Communication, and Security Seminar will be held together as below.

・Date/Time: December 14(Thursday) 6:00‐7:30 pm 
・Venue: Conference Room(3rd Floor), Tohoku Medical Megabank Building

[Program]
1. Explanation on the progress of the joint research (Masao Nagasaki, Tohoku University)

2. ・Lecturer: Masahide Sasaki(National Institute of Information and Communications Technology)
・Title: Super long-term secure secret sharing storage system using quantum key distribution technology 
・Abstract: Genome information and life-critical medical information of individuals are relevant to multiple families’ ancestry and lineage as well as multiple generations. If such information is leaked, it can cause irredeemable situations. Therefore, it is essential to guarantee super long-term confidentiality (information is not exposed to others) and integrity (data is not altered or falsified) of such information over a century. However, it is not impossible to secure super long-term confidentiality and integrity with the current coding alone since it cannot completely prevent future safety to be compromised. On the other hand, well-combined protocols of quantum key distribution technology and secret sharing can actualize a secret sharing storage system that doesn’t allow any computer machines to decode and that can restore the original data correctly even if servers of some areas are damaged due to disasters or similar events. At National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), research and development of super long-term secure secret sharing storage system are currently carried out with cooperation of medical institutions. In this seminar, the mechanism of quantum key distribution technology is explained and the overview of secure secret sharing storage system, the progress status of the project, and future prospects are discussed.

3. ・Lecturer: Hideaki Sato(Toshiba Corporate Research & Development Center)
・Title: Quantum Cryptography Technology at Toshiba and Overview of the Joint Research with Tohoku University 
・Abstract: Quantum cryptography communication is a cryptography communication system that actualizes the ultimate safety of data, and it enables realization of cryptography communication where data can never be decoded. Toshiba is currently taking initiatives to make a practical use of quantum cryptography technology developed by Cambridge Research Laboratory of Toshiba Research Europe Ltd. headquartered in England. Also, Toshiba has been conducting a joint research with Tohoku University on genomic data transmission since 2015. In this seminar, overview of progress of the joint research and current status of research and development of cutting-edge quantum cryptography communication device will be explained, and the future vision of systems utilizing quantum cryptography communication will be discussed.

4. Importance of security ( Takako Takai, Tohoku university)

5. Closing remarks (Fuji Nagami, Tohoku University)  

*This lecture is transferable as a class in the medical research-related lecture course. 

・Organizer: Fuji Nagami, Takako Takai, Masao Nagasaki

The locations and allele frequencies of SNVs of 3,554 Japanese individuals by whole genome sequences is available

We have released the new whole-genome reference panel with 3554 individuals of Japanese. The panel contains about qualified 37 million SNVs and about 13 million candidate SNVs. You can access the data from our integrative Japanese Genome Variation Database (iJGVD)

Tohoku University Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization
[NEWS] The locations and allele frequencies of SNVs of 3,554 Japanese individuals by whole genome sequences is available

The locations and allele frequencies of SNVs of 3,554 Japanese individuals by whole genome sequences is available

The 83rd In Silico Megabank Research Seminar(September 19, 2017)

The 83rd In Silico Megabank Research Seminar will be held on Tuesday, September 19. This Time, we will be welcoming Dr. Daron Standley, Osaka University as our lecturer, and he will be speaking on “Quantifying structural and functional convergence in immune cell repertoires”. 

・Date/Time: September 19(Tuesday) 5:00‐6:30 pm 
・Venue: Small Conference Room 2(3rd Floor), Tohoku Medical Megabank Building  
・Title: Quantifying structural and functional convergence in immune cell repertoires 
・Lecturer: Daron Standley(Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University)

*This lecture is transferable as a class in the medical research-related lecture course. 

・Abstract: It is well established that protein structure is more conserved than sequence on an evolutionary timescale.  This fact allows functional inferences to be drawn from proteins that share the same fold, even when their sequence similarity is quite low. In the case of B cell receptors, the relationships between sequence and structure and function are more complex. Most BCRs look similar globally but differ in the details of their antigen-binding regions. These differences are due to the fact that each BCR is assembled from a patchwork of genes, which are combined randomly and can be further diverged by random mutations upon antigen encounter. Traditionally, bioinformatics analysis of BCR sequences involves clustering those that arise from the same genes into “lineages”, in order to identify BCRs in a given donor that target a common antigen.  The diversity of BCRs has been estimated to exceed 1013 in humans, which means that it is very unlikely that any two donors will display the same repertoire of BCRs, even after exposure to the same antigen. Nevertheless, x-ray crystallographic studies have demonstrated that structurally and sequentially similar BCRs targeting common antigens can arise in different donors using different genes. Our hypothesis is that clusters of BCRs targeting the same antigen are more likely to have sequence and structural features in common than BCRs targeting different antigens. High-throughput sequencing methodologies can now deliver paired (heavy-light chain) sequence datasets on the order of 104  sequences per experiment, and are expected to improve rapidly in the near future. Clearly, x-ray crystallography will not be able to cope with so many emerging BCR sequences in a high-throughput manner. Thus, there is a strong motivation to leverage structural bioinformatics in order to infer structure and functional similarities. In this presentation, I will show results from our high-throughput BCR and TCR structural modeling platform (Si Repertoire Builder). Using multiple alignment and 3D rendering methods developed in our lab, we could reduce the time required to build an atomic-resolution BCR model to just seconds, corresponding to over 17,000 atomic resolution models per day on a single CPU. We then show that human BCRs acquired post flu vaccination display strong structural convergence, and even exhibit structural similarities to BCRs acquired from vaccinated mice. These findings suggest that BCR modeling, in combination with high-throughput sequencing may be able to identify diverse sequences targeting common antigens across donors and across species.  

・Organizer: Shunsuke Teraguchi, Masao Nagasaki